SNAP
Broad-based categorical eligibility (2020)1Gross income eligibility limit as % of Federal Poverty Guideline (2020)2Asset limit (2020)3
AlabamaYes130%No limit if categorically eligible4
AlaskaNo130%$2,250 5
ArizonaYes185%No limit if categorically eligible
ArkansasNo130%$2,250 5
CaliforniaYes200%No limit if categorically eligible6
ColoradoYes200%No limit if categorically eligible6
ConnecticutYes185%No limit if categorically eligible
DelawareYes200%No limit if categorically eligible
District of ColumbiaYes200%No limit if categorically eligible
FloridaYes200%No limit if categorically eligible6
GeorgiaYes130%No limit if categorically eligible6
HawaiiYes200%No limit if categorically eligible
IdahoYes130%$5,000 7
IllinoisYes165%No limit if categorically eligible6
IndianaYes130%$5,000
IowaYes160%No limit if categorically eligible
KansasNo130%$2,250 5
KentuckyYes200%No limit if categorically eligible6
LouisianaYes130%No limit if categorically eligible
MaineYes185%No limit if categorically eligible
MarylandYes200%No limit if categorically eligible
MassachusettsYes200%No limit if categorically eligible6
MichiganYes200%$15,000
MinnesotaYes165%No limit if categorically eligible
MississippiNo130%$2,2508
MissouriNo130%$2,250 5
MontanaYes200%No limit if categorically eligible
NebraskaYes130%$25,000 9
NevadaYes200%No limit if categorically eligible
New HampshireYes10185%No limit if categorically eligible11
New JerseyYes185%No limit if categorically eligible
New MexicoYes165%No limit if categorically eligible
New YorkYes12200% | 150%13No limit if categorically eligible6
North CarolinaYes200%No limit if categorically eligible
North DakotaYes200%No limit if categorically eligible
OhioYes130%No limit if categorically eligible6
OklahomaYes130%No limit if categorically eligible
OregonYes185%No limit if categorically eligible
PennsylvaniaYes160%No limit if categorically eligible6
Puerto RicoNot available in sourceNot available in sourceNot available in source
Rhode IslandYes185%No limit if categorically eligible6
South CarolinaYes130%No limit if categorically eligible6
South DakotaNo130%$2,250 5
TennesseeNo130%$2,250 5
TexasYes165%$5,000 14
UtahNo130%$2,250 5
VermontYes185%No limit if categorically eligible
VirginiaNo130%$2,250 5
WashingtonYes200%No limit if categorically eligible
West VirginiaYes200%No limit if categorically eligible6
WisconsinYes200%No limit if categorically eligible
WyomingNo130%$2,250 5

Footnotes and sources

  1. Note: Broad-based categorical eligibility (BBCE) is a policy in which households may become categorically eligible for SNAP because they qualify for a non-cash Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) or State maintenance of effort (MOE) funded benefit. Under broad-based categorical eligibility, households who receive or are authorized to receive noncash benefits funded by federal or state Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) or monies are deemed categorically eligible for SNAP benefits under income and asset rules that are generally more flexible than traditional SNAP guidelines. Source: Food and Nutrition Service (2019): Broad-based Categorical Eligibility. Washington, D.C.: United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved July 2020 from https://fns-prod.azureedge.net . For more information on SNAP guidelines, also see the Food and Nutrition Service's website at https://www.fns.usda.gov .
  2. Note: Households with an elderly or disabled member do not have a gross income limit in SNAP. Sources: (1) Food and Nutrition Service (2019): Broad-based Categorical Eligibility. Washington, DC: United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved July 2020 from https://fns-prod.azureedge.net . (2) Food and Nutrition Service (2019): Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Eligibility. Washington, D.C.: United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved November 2019 from https://www.fns.usda.gov .
  3. Note: Most states that allow eligibility for SNAP benefits based on the receipt of other income-support programs (categorical eligibility) do not place asset limits on SNAP recipients who are categorically eligible. Recipients in these states who are not categorically eligible face the federally-determined asset limit of $2,250, or $3,500 if a household member is elderly (60 years or older) or disabled. Sources: (1) Food and Nutrition Service (2019): Broad-based Categorical Eligibility. Washington, DC: United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved July 2020 from https://fns-prod.azureedge.net . (2) Food and Nutrition Service (2019): Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Eligibility. Washington, D.C.: United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved November 2019 from https://www.fns.usda.gov .
  4. Households with an elderly or disabled member with gross incomes over 200% of the federal poverty guideline (FPG) are not categorically eligible and face a $3,500 asset limit.
  5. Households with an elderly or disabled member face a $3,500 asset limit.
  6. Households with an elderly or disabled member with gross incomes over 200% of poverty face a $3,500 asset limit.
  7. For more information visit http://healthandwelfare.idaho.gov .
  8. Households with an elderly or disabled member face a $3,500 asset limit. As of July 1, 2019, Mississippi no longer administers BBCE. Source: Congressional Research Service (2019): The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP): Categorical Eligibility. Washington, D.C. Retrieved November 2019 from https://crsreports.congress.gov .
  9. Asset limit applies only to liquid assets.
  10. Households with at least one dependent child are eligible and a specified relative to that child are eligible.
  11. Categorical eligibility applies to households with at least one dependent child.
  12. Households with dependent care expenses or earned income are eligible.
  13. Households with dependent care expenses face a 200% gross income limit, but households with earned income that do not have dependent care expenses face a 150% gross income limit.
  14. Asset limit excludes one vehicle up to $15,000 and includes excess vehicle value.